Rhythm

rhythm

(ˈrɪðəm)

n

1. (Music, other)

a. the arrangement of the relative durations of and accents on the notes of a melody, usually laid out into regular groups (bars)of beats, the first beat of each bar carrying the stress
b. any specific arrangement of such groupings; time: quadruple rhythm.
2. (Poetry) (in poetry)

a. the arrangement of words into a more or less regular sequence of stressed and unstressed or long and short syllables
b. any specific such arrangement; metre
3. (Art Terms) (in painting, sculpture, architecture, etc) a harmonious sequence or pattern of masses alternating with voids, of lightalternating with shade, of alternating colours, etc
4. (Physiology) any sequence of regularly recurring functions or events, such as the regular recurrence of certain physiological functions of the body, as the cardiac rhythm of the heartbeat
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Synesthetic Transcription

“The key to the piece was devising a visual system who’s form and compositional dynamics matched the response to music.”

So basically, this is your brain on Burial’s music :

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/124047433″>What Need Angel</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/petercrnokrak”>Peter Crnokrak</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

What trees sound like!

Artist Bartholomäus Traubeck has custom-built a record player that is able to “play” cross-sectional slices of tree trunks. The result is his art piece “Years,” an audio recording of tree rings being read by a computer and turned into music, much like a record player’s needle reads the grooves on an LP.what

The tree rings are actually being translated into the language of music, rather than sounding musical in and of themselves. According to Makezine, the custom record player takes in data using a PlayStation Eye Camera and a stepper motor attached to its control arm, and relays the data to a computer. A program called Ableton Live then uses it to generate an eerie piano track. [Listen to the Six Spooky Sounds from the Deep]

Though the record player “interprets” rather than actually “playing” the tree trunk, as Gizmodo notes, the song still varies with each new piece of wood placed on the turntable.

(http://www.livescience.com/33673-tree-rings-sound-record-player.html)