Rhythm

rhythm

(ˈrɪðəm)

n

1. (Music, other)

a. the arrangement of the relative durations of and accents on the notes of a melody, usually laid out into regular groups (bars)of beats, the first beat of each bar carrying the stress
b. any specific arrangement of such groupings; time: quadruple rhythm.
2. (Poetry) (in poetry)

a. the arrangement of words into a more or less regular sequence of stressed and unstressed or long and short syllables
b. any specific such arrangement; metre
3. (Art Terms) (in painting, sculpture, architecture, etc) a harmonious sequence or pattern of masses alternating with voids, of lightalternating with shade, of alternating colours, etc
4. (Physiology) any sequence of regularly recurring functions or events, such as the regular recurrence of certain physiological functions of the body, as the cardiac rhythm of the heartbeat
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Synesthetic Transcription

“The key to the piece was devising a visual system who’s form and compositional dynamics matched the response to music.”

So basically, this is your brain on Burial’s music :

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/124047433″>What Need Angel</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/petercrnokrak”>Peter Crnokrak</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

SCIENCE!!

“Doctors would normally fix a tremor like Roger Frisch’s by keeping him awake during surgery, inserting electrodes deep into his brain until the trembling appeared to stop. But for a concert violinist, even the slightest remaining tremor would mean the end of the career, so in 2009 doctors at the Mayo Clinic designed a special violin for Frisch to play through his surgery. An accelerometer at the tip of the bow measured Frisch’s trembling, allowing doctors to fine-tune the placement of their electrodes.

By turning on a battery and sending a current into his brain, Frisch can now switch off his tremors whenever he needs to play.”

via The Verge